Adoption

Adoption, not just deployment

Many organizations today use different interaction tools. Workplace by Facebook, Slack, the Microsoft package, Yammer or you have a Facebook group. For many organizations it does not work as well as hoped. The reason, you have only implemented it and not thought about how it is received. The adoption of such tools must be done correctly. In this article, I’ll share the experiences I’ve done around the adoption of collaboration tools and provide you with a guide on to how to do it.

Adoption

Adoption, not just deployment

Many organizations today use different interaction tools. Workplace by Facebook, Slack, the Microsoft package, Yammer or you have a Facebook group. For many organizations it does not work as well as hoped. The reason, you have only implemented it and not thought about how it is received. The adoption of such tools must be done correctly. In this article, I’ll share the experiences I’ve done around the adoption of collaboration tools and provide you with a guide on to how to do it.

To reach the goal you must go through these five stages:

  1. Adop­tion­plan.
  2. Checking consis­tency in your own data.
  3. Choose between PC or smart­phone.
  4. Securing owner­ship.
  5. Follow up with measure­ments.

1. Adoptionplan

This seems reason­able, nobody would just roll out new tech­nology to the whole orga­ni­za­tion … or? Most people under­stand, that the answer is not to just buy the licenses for a new product and then send out an email invi­ta­tion to join.

For services used by humans, we must work hard to achieve adop­tion. 95% of busi­nesses are sloppy with of rollout of a new service, but we (Join21) want those percent­ages to drop. We want to ensure proper adop­tion that is a change so well that it also works when the hired consul­tant has left.

An adop­tion plan must contain the following:

  • Explain why we are doing this — create the same image in the heads of all involved people.
  • Verify the existing data.
  • Select PC and / or smart­phones.
  • Lead the change in the orga­ni­za­tion.
  • Estab­lish a project team with internal resources and poten­tially advi­sors.
  • Adop­tion­progam.
  • Follow ups.

The impact of inter­ac­tion tools at the work­place comes as a result of detailed plan­ning, where tech­nical solu­tions are the basis for the training and the follow-up.

There is a great deal of change manage­ment involved, that you might be respon­sible for. If you can’t lead that process, find someone who can. As members of the project team, we would look for people in the orga­ni­za­tion who are already impor­tant knowl­edge-brokers and have the skills to help others. They can be iden­ti­fied by a network analysis. The success of the project depends on the need for retro­spec­tive rescue oper­a­tions to increase the adop­tion of the new tech­nology. You must ensure that there is commu­ni­ca­tion to create common goals, and draw a new common future in the minds of your employees.

Tips: A good idea is to decide if any of the existing struc­tures should be aban­doned? Tech­nology fatigue occurs, but can be reme­died if some­thing else disap­pears. Automa­tion and digi­ti­za­tion roll over the employees who must constantly relate to some­thing new, but we must respect that new tech­nology must be mastered by the employees before it creates value.

Does the CEO still send an internal newsletter by e-mail (one-way commu­ni­ca­tion)? That commu­ni­ca­tion should move onto the new media/platform. If you go for the full package Office 365, then review the future of the printer standing in the base­ment. A major customer took the oppor­tu­nity when switching to Microsoft Share­Point, announcing that in 12 months, the printer would be closed to everyone for printing, and the right to read printed copies another 12 months later. This makes people under­stand what direc­tion the orga­ni­za­tion is going, while still giving time to adapt to the new times.

It is impor­tant to have respect for the ingrained habits at the work­place and the current culture. Try the following exper­i­ment: Move your watch over to the right arm and observe the number of days before you are no longer looking at the left arm. It will show you how diffi­cult it is to change a habit.

Consistency in your own data

Before releasing new tools or converting from old Office pack­ages to new versions, or going from Exchange mail server in the base­ment to the cloud, you must ensure that you have consis­tent data in the system where users are managed and assigned rights.

We have observed varying levels of data quality. A few exam­ples: Someone who had an email address, but was no longer employed, employees who did not have an email address, employees who have two email addresses, regis­tered with the wrong depart­ment or in two depart­ments, no or incor­rect land­line and mobile number besides the same person regis­tered with different data in different systems.

This becomes an issue when it comes to the adop­tion of new services in an orga­ni­za­tion, and must be fixed before­hand.

Good data struc­ture ensures that errors do not proceed to other systems, and if you want a future with automa­tion and BOTs, it requires data without error. Privacy policy and GDPR also become easier when you have a good data struc­ture and updated infor­ma­tion. Impact assess­ment of which other systems that can access specific employee data becomes easier when we have a well-defined struc­ture and updated data.

Velge pc og eller mobil

Choose between PC or smartphone

It’s not a joke — you have to make this choice. If all employees have a paid smart­phone, the case is easier. Then it makes sense to ask everyone to install a new app on the mobile so the new service can be used every­where, with the addi­tional PC or browser. In cases where employees do not have a company-based smart­phone, laptop or even e-mail address, there must be another solu­tion. Involve those who are affected and get a joint of the situ­a­tion. Can you require or request to install a job app on a private smart­phone? What do employees think of this? You can’t assume, you must know for sure.

In this part of your plan, you also decide whether it is mean­ingful to invite external connec­tions such as suppliers, customers or industry asso­ci­a­tions. But this creates a new require­ment: we may need a slightly better tone in the forum where the customer is invited. In addi­tion, it may be diffi­cult to remember which forums your customers are in and which ones are for internal commu­ni­ca­tion. But now, it is possible to have inter­nals in the same groups as exter­nals. Working faster, not having to go through many layers of manage­ment.

Tip: Create a plan for the rollout and think about it like the journey of a paying customer (yes, see employees as customers on this project). How do we facil­i­tate high adop­tion in a short period of time? Search for customer journey and use symbols that everyone under­stands. Show it to colleagues outside the project group and request feed­back. Be open and listen to the crit­i­cism, adjust and try again. Draw it as it should look and ask some test subjects for feed­back. Espe­cially if the employees them­selves have a role in installing an app, this is impor­tant.

Imagine how those who do not respond to the first or second e-mail can be moti­vated or and those who are employed in the future. The customer journey is your respon­si­bility and vital for you or your colleagues in the support of not being charged in retro­spect.

Tip: Just because a new inter­ac­tion plat­form is open 24/7 does not mean we should work around the clock. Perhaps it is a discus­sion worth whether internal guide­lines should be updated?

Securing ownership

Major changes must of course be decided and anchored at a high orga­ni­za­tional level. The project must be adapted to other activ­i­ties, but you will manage. It is common project manage­ment and either you work with senior manage­ment or your adviser does. At this stage, it is neces­sary to clarify what manage­ment wants to use a new inter­ac­tion plat­form for. New oppor­tu­ni­ties for infor­ma­tion dissem­i­na­tion and two-way dialogue are discussed here.

Most impor­tantly, is how we get the staff to use a new tool. There are many different job features, seniority, knowl­edge, expe­ri­ences and differ­ences in skills that all affect the adop­tion. Keep in mind that it’s not all tasks where the employee sits all day long in front of a screen. Age can also affect the adop­tion — not everyone is familiar with looking after everyone (even inter­nally in the company) and you may want to offer a special course. An analysis must be done that maps which purposes are common to the company and which may be specific to a depart­ment. Here there should also be discus­sions about the use of open / closed groups if the inter­ac­tion plat­form allows for it.

Without a doubt, new tools require changing the way we interact with change manage­ment. There is a lot of good liter­a­ture about this and many compa­nies prob­ably have these skills at the fore­front. Most well-known is John P. Kotter for his “8 steps to trans­form your orga­ni­za­tion” but you can also get inspi­ra­tion from Kurt Lewin who was before Kotter. He formu­lated the method “thaw — modify — freeze again”. The simi­larity is that any change requires the stamina of those who run it and there is nothing more frus­trating than to find that an internal change program runs into the dirt and does not give the effect that the orga­ni­za­tion orig­i­nally believed in.

An adop­tion program for inter­ac­tion tools must support the orga­ni­za­tions strategy, and be anchored from the exec­u­tives ship.

Follow up

Often we get the ques­tion of what is the return on invest­ment from a single product such as Work­place by Face­book? The short answer is that it depends on what you set as measure­ment points. It is too far out to claim that a new inter­ac­tion plat­form can provide a measur­able gain in the finan­cial accounts. But in the inno­va­tion accounts we can observe corre­la­tion — everyone knows that you need to take in lots of good ideas to locate the one idea that is one step further in the inno­va­tion process. Here the number of ideas in total or in different cate­gories becomes a KPI. If you are doing employee satis­fac­tion measure­ments then we will observe posi­tive trends.

We provide a dash­board that is directly linked to the inter­ac­tion plat­form where the project can learn the appli­ca­tion, and how it changes over time. Partic­u­larly in the adop­tion process, it is exciting and provides you with posi­tive energy when the inter­ac­tion can be docu­mented.

In times when the orga­ni­za­tion changes, it gives great value when we can suddenly see what happens to inno­va­tion and inter­ac­tion under pres­sure. The same goes true when we are to merge, or a new CEO for example. The HR depart­ment gets a new set of binoc­u­lars to look through.

PS: If there are divi­sions in other coun­tries and time zones, languages and culture will come in as extra topping. Search for spar­ring part­ners, or help to lead multi­na­tional change projects if you do not already have the skills.

Målestokk for innovasjon og medarbeidertilfredshet

In addi­tion to finan­cial results, it is advis­able to estab­lish a bench­mark for inno­va­tion and employee satis­fac­tion.

To reach the goal you must go through these five stages:

  1. Adop­tion­plan.
  2. Checking consis­tency in your own data.
  3. Choose between PC or smart­phone.
  4. Securing owner­ship.
  5. Follow up with measure­ments.

1. Adoptionplan

This seems reason­able, nobody would just roll out new tech­nology to the whole orga­ni­za­tion … or? Most people under­stand, that the answer is not to just buy the licenses for a new product and then send out an email invi­ta­tion to join.

For services used by humans, we must work hard to achieve adop­tion. 95% of busi­nesses are sloppy with of rollout of a new service, but we (Join21) want those percent­ages to drop. We want to ensure proper adop­tion that is a change so well that it also works when the hired consul­tant has left.

An adop­tion plan must contain the following:

  • Explain why we are doing this — create the same image in the heads of all involved people.
  • Verify the existing data.
  • Select PC and / or smart­phones.
  • Lead the change in the orga­ni­za­tion.
  • Estab­lish a project team with internal resources and poten­tially advi­sors.
  • Adop­tion­progam.
  • Follow ups.

The impact of inter­ac­tion tools at the work­place comes as a result of detailed plan­ning, where tech­nical solu­tions are the basis for the training and the follow-up.

There is a great deal of change manage­ment involved, that you might be respon­sible for. If you can’t lead that process, find someone who can. As members of the project team, we would look for people in the orga­ni­za­tion who are already impor­tant knowl­edge-brokers and have the skills to help others. They can be iden­ti­fied by a network analysis. The success of the project depends on the need for retro­spec­tive rescue oper­a­tions to increase the adop­tion of the new tech­nology. You must ensure that there is commu­ni­ca­tion to create common goals, and draw a new common future in the minds of your employees.

Tips: A good idea is to decide if any of the existing struc­tures should be aban­doned? Tech­nology fatigue occurs, but can be reme­died if some­thing else disap­pears. Automa­tion and digi­ti­za­tion roll over the employees who must constantly relate to some­thing new, but we must respect that new tech­nology must be mastered by the employees before it creates value.

Does the CEO still send an internal newsletter by e-mail (one-way commu­ni­ca­tion)? That commu­ni­ca­tion should move onto the new media/platform. If you go for the full package Office 365, then review the future of the printer standing in the base­ment. A major customer took the oppor­tu­nity when switching to Microsoft Share­Point, announcing that in 12 months, the printer would be closed to everyone for printing, and the right to read printed copies another 12 months later. This makes people under­stand what direc­tion the orga­ni­za­tion is going, while still giving time to adapt to the new times.

It is impor­tant to have respect for the ingrained habits at the work­place and the current culture. Try the following exper­i­ment: Move your watch over to the right arm and observe the number of days before you are no longer looking at the left arm. It will show you how diffi­cult it is to change a habit.

Consistency in your own data

Before releasing new tools or converting from old Office pack­ages to new versions, or going from Exchange mail server in the base­ment to the cloud, you must ensure that you have consis­tent data in the system where users are managed and assigned rights.

We have observed varying levels of data quality. A few exam­ples: Someone who had an email address, but was no longer employed, employees who did not have an email address, employees who have two email addresses, regis­tered with the wrong depart­ment or in two depart­ments, no or incor­rect land­line and mobile number besides the same person regis­tered with different data in different systems.

This becomes an issue when it comes to the adop­tion of new services in an orga­ni­za­tion, and must be fixed before­hand.

Good data struc­ture ensures that errors do not proceed to other systems, and if you want a future with automa­tion and BOTs, it requires data without error. Privacy policy and GDPR also become easier when you have a good data struc­ture and updated infor­ma­tion. Impact assess­ment of which other systems that can access specific employee data becomes easier when we have a well-defined struc­ture and updated data.

Velge pc og eller mobil

Choose between PC or smartphone

It’s not a joke — you have to make this choice. If all employees have a paid smart­phone, the case is easier. Then it makes sense to ask everyone to install a new app on the mobile so the new service can be used every­where, with the addi­tional PC or browser. In cases where employees do not have a company-based smart­phone, laptop or even e-mail address, there must be another solu­tion. Involve those who are affected and get a joint of the situ­a­tion. Can you require or request to install a job app on a private smart­phone? What do employees think of this? You can’t assume, you must know for sure.

In this part of your plan, you also decide whether it is mean­ingful to invite external connec­tions such as suppliers, customers or industry asso­ci­a­tions. But this creates a new require­ment: we may need a slightly better tone in the forum where the customer is invited. In addi­tion, it may be diffi­cult to remember which forums your customers are in and which ones are for internal commu­ni­ca­tion. But now, it is possible to have inter­nals in the same groups as exter­nals. Working faster, not having to go through many layers of manage­ment.

Tip: Create a plan for the rollout and think about it like the journey of a paying customer (yes, see employees as customers on this project). How do we facil­i­tate high adop­tion in a short period of time? Search for customer journey and use symbols that everyone under­stands. Show it to colleagues outside the project group and request feed­back. Be open and listen to the crit­i­cism, adjust and try again. Draw it as it should look and ask some test subjects for feed­back. Espe­cially if the employees them­selves have a role in installing an app, this is impor­tant.

Imagine how those who do not respond to the first or second e-mail can be moti­vated or and those who are employed in the future. The customer journey is your respon­si­bility and vital for you or your colleagues in the support of not being charged in retro­spect.

Tip: Just because a new inter­ac­tion plat­form is open 24/7 does not mean we should work around the clock. Perhaps it is a discus­sion worth whether internal guide­lines should be updated?

Securing ownership

Major changes must of course be decided and anchored at a high orga­ni­za­tional level. The project must be adapted to other activ­i­ties, but you will manage. It is common project manage­ment and either you work with senior manage­ment or your adviser does. At this stage, it is neces­sary to clarify what manage­ment wants to use a new inter­ac­tion plat­form for. New oppor­tu­ni­ties for infor­ma­tion dissem­i­na­tion and two-way dialogue are discussed here.

Most impor­tantly, is how we get the staff to use a new tool. There are many different job features, seniority, knowl­edge, expe­ri­ences and differ­ences in skills that all affect the adop­tion. Keep in mind that it’s not all tasks where the employee sits all day long in front of a screen. Age can also affect the adop­tion — not everyone is familiar with looking after everyone (even inter­nally in the company) and you may want to offer a special course. An analysis must be done that maps which purposes are common to the company and which may be specific to a depart­ment. Here there should also be discus­sions about the use of open / closed groups if the inter­ac­tion plat­form allows for it.

Without a doubt, new tools require changing the way we interact with change manage­ment. There is a lot of good liter­a­ture about this and many compa­nies prob­ably have these skills at the fore­front. Most well-known is John P. Kotter for his “8 steps to trans­form your orga­ni­za­tion” but you can also get inspi­ra­tion from Kurt Lewin who was before Kotter. He formu­lated the method “thaw — modify — freeze again”. The simi­larity is that any change requires the stamina of those who run it and there is nothing more frus­trating than to find that an internal change program runs into the dirt and does not give the effect that the orga­ni­za­tion orig­i­nally believed in.

An adop­tion program for inter­ac­tion tools must support the orga­ni­za­tions strategy, and be anchored from the exec­u­tives ship.

Målestokk for innovasjon og medarbeidertilfredshet

In addi­tion to finan­cial results, it is advis­able to estab­lish a bench­mark for inno­va­tion and employee satis­fac­tion.

Follow up

Often we get the ques­tion of what is the return on invest­ment from a single product such as Work­place by Face­book? The short answer is that it depends on what you set as measure­ment points. It is too far out to claim that a new inter­ac­tion plat­form can provide a measur­able gain in the finan­cial accounts. But in the inno­va­tion accounts we can observe corre­la­tion — everyone knows that you need to take in lots of good ideas to locate the one idea that is one step further in the inno­va­tion process. Here the number of ideas in total or in different cate­gories becomes a KPI. If you are doing employee satis­fac­tion measure­ments then we will observe posi­tive trends.

We provide a dash­board that is directly linked to the inter­ac­tion plat­form where the project can learn the appli­ca­tion, and how it changes over time. Partic­u­larly in the adop­tion process, it is exciting and provides you with posi­tive energy when the inter­ac­tion can be docu­mented.

In times when the orga­ni­za­tion changes, it gives great value when we can suddenly see what happens to inno­va­tion and inter­ac­tion under pres­sure. The same goes true when we are to merge, or a new CEO for example. The HR depart­ment gets a new set of binoc­u­lars to look through.

PS: If there are divi­sions in other coun­tries and time zones, languages and culture will come in as extra topping. Search for spar­ring part­ners, or help to lead multi­na­tional change projects if you do not already have the skills.

Carsten Helmuth Pedersen, country manager, Denmark

CARSTEN HELMUTH PEDERSEN

Carsten is passionate about inno­va­tion and busi­ness devel­op­ment. He has expe­ri­ence with the combi­na­tion of analogue and digital customer jour­neys. He will eagerly share his perspec­tives so contact him to get a new angle on a problem or council concerning inno­va­tion. He has a degree in engi­neering, supple­mented with an HD in foreign trade and recently a Masters of Manage­ment in Tech­nology eMBA from Aalborg Univer­sity, which, together with many expe­ri­ences from both small/medium segment busi­nesses and multi­na­tional compa­nies in roles as a leader, project manager, product manager and intrapre­neur, is used for the benefit of our customers.

Carsten Helmuth Pedersen, country manager, Denmark

CARSTEN HELMUTH PEDERSEN

Carsten is passionate about inno­va­tion and busi­ness devel­op­ment. He has expe­ri­ence with the combi­na­tion of analogue and digital customer jour­neys. He will eagerly share his perspec­tives so contact him to get a new angle on a problem or council concerning inno­va­tion. He has a degree in engi­neering, supple­mented with an HD in foreign trade and recently a Masters of Manage­ment in Tech­nology eMBA from Aalborg Univer­sity, which, together with many expe­ri­ences from both small/medium segment busi­nesses and multi­na­tional compa­nies in roles as a leader, project manager, product manager and intrapre­neur, is used for the benefit of our customers.

2018-11-13T21:01:49+00:00

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