Jan Taug

It is in the network knowledge lives, trust is created and work happens. 90% of executives have never seen their organization as a network. It’s quite intimidating when we know how interconnected the world has become.”

- Jan Taug, PhD

Jan Taug

It is in the network knowledge lives, trust is created and work happens. 90% of executives have never seen their organization as a network. It’s quite intimidating when we know how interconnected the world has become.”

- Jan Taug, PhD

Work smarter

Digitalized leaders

  • Less than 10% of managers have ever seen their orga­ni­za­tion as a network.
  • It is in the network knowl­edge lives, trust is created, and work happens.
  • The average leader discuss with approx­i­mately 1.7 people before making an impor­tant deci­sion.
Work smarter

Digitalized leaders

  • Less than 10% of managers have ever seen their orga­ni­za­tion as a network.
  • It is in the network knowl­edge lives, trust is created, and work happens.
  • The average leader discuss with approx­i­mately 1.7 people before making an impor­tant deci­sion.

Leaders speak about “Breaking down the silos, Digitization and Transformation”. The wanted results are not coming from digitization, but from working smarter. When digitizing It starts with the leadership. Do they have the ability to break down the barriers they themselves built? Under 10% of managers have seen their organization as a network, and they go to 1.7 people before making an important decision, one of those being themselves.

Through many years working with and in large compa­nies, my expe­ri­ence suggest that what most employees hear when digi­tataza­tion is discussed is: Manage­ment is cutting down on employees, digi­tizing my job, and nobody under­stands trans­for­ma­tion. Perhaps employees believe that they should be trans­formed into some­thing different from what we are today … but what? The largest problem is that manage­ment does not under­stand how to launch new tech­nology so it creates value for the orga­ni­za­tion and its employees.

nettverksledelse

Figure 1 — Leaders talk about taking down the silos and then you need to under­stand network manage­ment.

What is digitalization?

My expe­ri­ence is that we have to start with the leaders, they built the silos, and often enjoy sitting on top of the silo. They might think results will come auto­mat­i­cally when digi­tal­izing, but perhaps it’s the lead­er­ship that needs trans­for­ma­tion. In the estab­lished ‘silos’, it is a matter of working more across disci­plines, digi­tizing is the use of new tech­nology to give bene­fits to the indi­vidual and the orga­ni­za­tion, and trans­for­ma­tion means that we must adjust the way we work in line with the tech­no­log­ical devel­op­ment.

Leaders are comfort­able with the hier­archy, it is predictable and easy to under­stand. Under 10% of busi­ness leaders have seen their own orga­ni­za­tion as a network, which is funda­mental to under­stand how the orga­ni­za­tion really works. That is pretty intim­i­dating consid­ering how inter­con­nected the world has become. The current hypoth­esis is that the managers are the best at managing infor­ma­tion to make deci­sions and give input to inno­va­tion and improve­ments. In my career working with star­tups, inter­na­tional compa­nies, govern­ment / munic­ipal orga­ni­za­tions and in my PhD, I have always been inter­ested in the rela­tion­ship between knowl­edge and value creation. A reason­able hypoth­esis is that if you rely on rele­vant infor­ma­tion and unique knowl­edge and do not share it with anyone, the value creation becomes small. The ques­tion then becomes; what happens if you system­at­i­cally start sharing your unique knowl­edge with others? In short, is about putting knowl­edge in motion.

90% of leaders in global compa­nies do not have enough insight into how the orga­ni­za­tion actu­ally works.

Digital fitness

I have inves­ti­gated a ‘digi­ti­za­tion index’ on the 50 largest compa­nies in Norway. Corre­lated with the leader’s digital foot­prints some leaders perform well. A few of these are good leaders, others perform well because they have their own, often younger, experts who do the job for them. We have also attempted to look at the entire manage­ment team in these compa­nies, but had to make a repre­sen­ta­tive selec­tion, due to the amount. Initial find­ings show that there is less ‘digital fitness’ among leaders than the average digital knowl­edge in the orga­ni­za­tion. Those with the best chance of success are surpris­ingly compa­nies with a CEO who lives digi­tally and has a manage­ment team who under­stands the impor­tance of using cloud services and social media as a natural part of their work.

Orga­ni­za­tions with leaders with low digital fitness have little chance of succeeding in their digi­ti­za­tion plans. We have worked with orga­ni­za­tions where the tech­nology commu­nity has initi­ated automa­tion processes, or the launch of inter­ac­tion solu­tions. There will be some good stories to tell the board or munic­ipal govern­ment, but rarely a company that gets smarter and faster at utilizing new tech­nology. Here the term “adop­tion becomes rele­vant. There is a ‘tech­nology fatigue’ out there, and the people fail to use what the leaders and IT depart­ment try to imple­ment.

Too much knit and binders in Norwe­gian compa­nies! Should you succeed in automating customer service, the indi­vidual and organization’s Digital Fitness must be at a certain level, unless you will fail …

Figure 2 — A manage­ment team that has worked with inter­op­er­ability services — before and after.

The necessity of networks

Network manage­ment is under­standing the orga­ni­za­tion as a network, setting up an inter­dis­ci­pli­nary program (HR, IT, Com. owned by manage­ment. Then clev­erly launch rele­vant tech­nology. Find the key indi­vid­uals and knowl­edge-brokers that can help other employees under­stand why and build a struc­ture in the orga­ni­za­tion that helps people utilize new tech­nology in a way that creates value for the indi­vidual and the orga­ni­za­tion.

It is vital that managers and experts work inter­dis­ci­pli­nary and directly. Orga­ni­za­tions where one has to go through 3 to 4 people before obtaining the right exper­tise do not last long. The assess­ment of good ideas often take too long, and stops prema­turely if a leader must make an assess­ment, before the idea has actu­ally been tested. In addi­tion, my research shows that managers go to 1.7 people before making a deci­sion, one of those being them­selves. So, after discussing what is going to be decided with them­selves for a while, managers on average ask 0.7 people for input. The most fright­ening thing is that they go to someone who is close and a similar to them, so in reality they actu­ally ask for a confir­ma­tion of their own deci­sion.

Leaders always prefer to talk to them­selves…

System thinking is about seeing the bigger picture

What is the alter­na­tive? There is a lot to learn from system thinkers like Fran­cisco Varela, Humberto Matu­rana and Gregory Bateson, don’t want to read?, watch: Pay it forward, Butterfly effect, or Game of Thrones. They show how the outside world is a system where things are connected, adjust one thing, and it has conse­quences else­where. In Game of Thrones, you also see that leaders with good and inter­dis­ci­pli­nary rela­tion­ships are those who survive. Today’s world is becoming more and more linked together across features, orga­ni­za­tions, and coun­tries, while the tech­nology is advancing at fast rate.

Game Of Thrones network

Figure 3 — In contrast to public and private leaders resigning, in game of thrones it is about survival. Tyrion is one of those who has had rela­tions across the board since the begin­ning, and he is still alive.

Put knowledge in motion, it creates value

Network-manage­ment is about; Creating inter­ac­tion, linking exper­tise, making good deci­sions, managing change and diffi­culty, creating energy and inno­va­tion, and creating good rela­tion­ships with customers and part­ners. It drives the collec­tive intel­li­gence which becomes increas­ingly more impor­tant for effi­ciency and value creation. From an orga­ni­za­tional design perspec­tive, it is crucial to under­stand networks. An example from our prac­tice; an orga­ni­za­tion wanted to auto­mate manual processes that took unnec­es­sary time and created frus­tra­tion. Normally, the managers point out who should attend, and they often pick the same people. This time, they iden­ti­fied partic­i­pants based on network data and selected those who were keen to fix the selected processes, those with rele­vant tech­no­log­ical knowl­edge, those who gener­ated ideas, and the best project managers put together in what we call Smart Teams. The inter­dis­ci­pli­nary approach means that they solve the problem twice as fast and with twice the quality.

Those whom the leaders point out are rarely the right people to take the task.

Transformation is about working smarter

Trans­for­ma­tion is about finding new and smarter ways to work and building good networks inter­nally and exter­nally with customers and part­ners. Digi­ti­za­tion is applying new tech­nology in a way that creates value for the indi­vidual, and for the orga­ni­za­tion, and for the world. We need to under­stand orga­ni­za­tions as networks, and be conscious of how value is created through inter­dis­ci­pli­narity.

We can observe the silos and how they should be connected to create more inter­ac­tion and value, we observe who is central, who is isolated, and who connects different ecosys­tems together. With this knowl­edge we can create good solu­tions that result in committed employees, inno­va­tion and produc­tivity. For digi­ti­za­tion, network insights are used for the intel­li­gent launch of new tech­nology, and to facil­i­tate orga­ni­za­tional changes smarter. Knowl­edge is alive in networks, trust is created and it’s where work happens. It chal­lenges the leaders and the estab­lished order, because networks are often invis­ible and diffi­cult to lead.

Intelligent technology launch

Figure 4 — Networks can be used to under­stand commu­ni­ca­tion, launch new tech­nology, adjust orga­ni­za­tional design, here we observe the siloes, central indi­vid­uals, and the brokers that keep the orga­ni­za­tion together.

Network-based value creation is leadership 4.0

When looking at an orga­ni­za­tion as a network, nobody is the same. From a value creation perspec­tive, the networks are vital, and exec­u­tives who under­stand the impor­tance of networks and can comfort­ably facil­i­tate them have a unique advan­tage over those who embrace their own power. Scan­di­na­vian leaders have an advan­tage due to a more involving and open lead­er­ship style. With good algo­rithms, new tech­nology and good help, orga­ni­za­tions can gain unique insight and lead amongst the top 10% compa­nies in the world, for now. Time is of the essence.

Call to action:
1) Contact Jan for a chat – jan[a]join21.com
2) Learn more about Network Manage­ment in our ‘Exec­u­tive Short Program with BI.

Network Manage­ment in prac­tice
nettverksledelse

Figure 1 — Leaders talk about taking down the silos and then you need to under­stand network manage­ment.

Leaders speak about “Breaking down the silos, Digitization and Transformation”. The wanted results are not coming from digitization, but from working smarter. When digitizing It starts with the leadership. Do they have the ability to break down the barriers they themselves built? Under 10% of managers have seen their organization as a network, and they go to 1.7 people before making an important decision, one of those being themselves.

Through many years working with and in large compa­nies, my expe­ri­ence suggest that what most employees hear when digi­tataza­tion is discussed is: Manage­ment is cutting down on employees, digi­tizing my job, and nobody under­stands trans­for­ma­tion. Perhaps employees believe that they should be trans­formed into some­thing different from what we are today … but what? The largest problem is that manage­ment does not under­stand how to launch new tech­nology so it creates value for the orga­ni­za­tion and its employees.

90% of leaders in global compa­nies do not have enough insight into how the orga­ni­za­tion actu­ally works.

What is digitalization?

My expe­ri­ence is that we have to start with the leaders, they built the silos, and often enjoy sitting on top of the silo. They might think results will come auto­mat­i­cally when digi­tal­izing, but perhaps it’s the lead­er­ship that needs trans­for­ma­tion. In the estab­lished ‘silos’, it is a matter of working more across disci­plines, digi­tizing is the use of new tech­nology to give bene­fits to the indi­vidual and the orga­ni­za­tion, and trans­for­ma­tion means that we must adjust the way we work in line with the tech­no­log­ical devel­op­ment.

Leaders are comfort­able with the hier­archy, it is predictable and easy to under­stand. Under 10% of busi­ness leaders have seen their own orga­ni­za­tion as a network, which is funda­mental to under­stand how the orga­ni­za­tion really works. That is pretty intim­i­dating consid­ering how inter­con­nected the world has become. The current hypoth­esis is that the managers are the best at managing infor­ma­tion to make deci­sions and give input to inno­va­tion and improve­ments. In my career working with star­tups, inter­na­tional compa­nies, govern­ment / munic­ipal orga­ni­za­tions and in my PhD, I have always been inter­ested in the rela­tion­ship between knowl­edge and value creation. A reason­able hypoth­esis is that if you rely on rele­vant infor­ma­tion and unique knowl­edge and do not share it with anyone, the value creation becomes small. The ques­tion then becomes; what happens if you system­at­i­cally start sharing your unique knowl­edge with others? In short, is about putting knowl­edge in motion.

Too much knit and binders in Norwe­gian compa­nies! Should you succeed in automating customer service, the indi­vidual and organization’s Digital Fitness must be at a certain level, unless you will fail …

Figure 2 — A manage­ment team that has worked with inter­op­er­ability services — before and after.

Digital fitness

I have inves­ti­gated a ‘digi­ti­za­tion index’ on the 50 largest compa­nies in Norway. Corre­lated with the leader’s digital foot­prints some leaders perform well. A few of these are good leaders, others perform well because they have their own, often younger, experts who do the job for them. We have also attempted to look at the entire manage­ment team in these compa­nies, but had to make a repre­sen­ta­tive selec­tion, due to the amount. Initial find­ings show that there is less ‘digital fitness’ among leaders than the average digital knowl­edge in the orga­ni­za­tion. Those with the best chance of success are surpris­ingly compa­nies with a CEO who lives digi­tally and has a manage­ment team who under­stands the impor­tance of using cloud services and social media as a natural part of their work.

Orga­ni­za­tions with leaders with low digital fitness have little chance of succeeding in their digi­ti­za­tion plans. We have worked with orga­ni­za­tions where the tech­nology commu­nity has initi­ated automa­tion processes, or the launch of inter­ac­tion solu­tions. There will be some good stories to tell the board or munic­ipal govern­ment, but rarely a company that gets smarter and faster at utilizing new tech­nology. Here the term “adop­tion becomes rele­vant. There is a ‘tech­nology fatigue’ out there, and the people fail to use what the leaders and IT depart­ment try to imple­ment.

Leaders always prefer to talk to them­selves…

The necessity of networks

Network manage­ment is under­standing the orga­ni­za­tion as a network, setting up an inter­dis­ci­pli­nary program (HR, IT, Com. owned by manage­ment. Then clev­erly launch rele­vant tech­nology. Find the key indi­vid­uals and knowl­edge-brokers that can help other employees under­stand why and build a struc­ture in the orga­ni­za­tion that helps people utilize new tech­nology in a way that creates value for the indi­vidual and the orga­ni­za­tion.

It is vital that managers and experts work inter­dis­ci­pli­nary and directly. Orga­ni­za­tions where one has to go through 3 to 4 people before obtaining the right exper­tise do not last long. The assess­ment of good ideas often take too long, and stops prema­turely if a leader must make an assess­ment, before the idea has actu­ally been tested. In addi­tion, my research shows that managers go to 1.7 people before making a deci­sion, one of those being them­selves. So, after discussing what is going to be decided with them­selves for a while, managers on average ask 0.7 people for input. The most fright­ening thing is that they go to someone who is close and a similar to them, so in reality they actu­ally ask for a confir­ma­tion of their own deci­sion.

System thinking is about seeing the bigger picture

What is the alter­na­tive? There is a lot to learn from system thinkers like Fran­cisco Varela, Humberto Matu­rana and Gregory Bateson, don’t want to read?, watch: Pay it forward, Butterfly effect, or Game of Thrones. They show how the outside world is a system where things are connected, adjust one thing, and it has conse­quences else­where. In Game of Thrones, you also see that leaders with good and inter­dis­ci­pli­nary rela­tion­ships are those who survive. Today’s world is becoming more and more linked together across features, orga­ni­za­tions, and coun­tries, while the tech­nology is advancing at fast rate.

Game Of Thrones network

Figure 3 — In contrast to public and private leaders resigning, in game of thrones it is about survival. Tyrion is one of those who has had rela­tions across the board since the begin­ning, and he is still alive.

Those whom the leaders point out are rarely the right people to take the task.

Put knowledge in motion, it creates value

Network-manage­ment is about; Creating inter­ac­tion, linking exper­tise, making good deci­sions, managing change and diffi­culty, creating energy and inno­va­tion, and creating good rela­tion­ships with customers and part­ners. It drives the collec­tive intel­li­gence which becomes increas­ingly more impor­tant for effi­ciency and value creation. From an orga­ni­za­tional design perspec­tive, it is crucial to under­stand networks. An example from our prac­tice; an orga­ni­za­tion wanted to auto­mate manual processes that took unnec­es­sary time and created frus­tra­tion. Normally, the managers point out who should attend, and they often pick the same people. This time, they iden­ti­fied partic­i­pants based on network data and selected those who were keen to fix the selected processes, those with rele­vant tech­no­log­ical knowl­edge, those who gener­ated ideas, and the best project managers put together in what we call Smart Teams. The inter­dis­ci­pli­nary approach means that they solve the problem twice as fast and with twice the quality.

Transformation is about working smarter

Trans­for­ma­tion is about finding new and smarter ways to work and building good networks inter­nally and exter­nally with customers and part­ners. Digi­ti­za­tion is applying new tech­nology in a way that creates value for the indi­vidual, and for the orga­ni­za­tion, and for the world. We need to under­stand orga­ni­za­tions as networks, and be conscious of how value is created through inter­dis­ci­pli­narity.

We can observe the silos and how they should be connected to create more inter­ac­tion and value, we observe who is central, who is isolated, and who connects different ecosys­tems together. With this knowl­edge we can create good solu­tions that result in committed employees, inno­va­tion and produc­tivity. For digi­ti­za­tion, network insights are used for the intel­li­gent launch of new tech­nology, and to facil­i­tate orga­ni­za­tional changes smarter. Knowl­edge is alive in networks, trust is created and it’s where work happens. It chal­lenges the leaders and the estab­lished order, because networks are often invis­ible and diffi­cult to lead.

Intelligent technology launch

Figure 4 — Networks can be used to under­stand commu­ni­ca­tion, launch new tech­nology, adjust orga­ni­za­tional design, here we observe the siloes, central indi­vid­uals, and the brokers that keep the orga­ni­za­tion together.

Network-based value creation is leadership 4.0

When looking at an orga­ni­za­tion as a network, nobody is the same. From a value creation perspec­tive, the networks are vital, and exec­u­tives who under­stand the impor­tance of networks and can comfort­ably facil­i­tate them have a unique advan­tage over those who embrace their own power. Scan­di­na­vian leaders have an advan­tage due to a more involving and open lead­er­ship style. With good algo­rithms, new tech­nology and good help, orga­ni­za­tions can gain unique insight and lead amongst the top 10% compa­nies in the world, for now. Time is of the essence.

Call to action:
1) Contact Jan for a chat – jan[a]join21.com
2) Learn more about Network Manage­ment in our ‘Exec­u­tive Short Program with BI.

Network Manage­ment in prac­tice
Jan Taug, founder and CEO

JAN TAUG

Jan Taug has worked over 12 years with star­tups and invest­ments, a PhD from the US, and has worked on projects for the EU, OECD, UN. After 10 years of manage­ment expe­ri­ence and inno­va­tion in Telenor, focusing on glob­al­iza­tion and digi­ti­za­tion, he has become an entre­pre­neur again. Taug has also been Assoc. Professor of BI’s Insti­tute of entre­pre­neur­ship and strategy for over 10 years.
BI Norwe­gian Busi­ness School and JOIN21 have set up a program for leaders called Network Manage­ment in prac­tice, it may be a good place to start for those who want to under­stand more.

Jan Taug, founder and CEO

JAN TAUG

Jan Taug has worked over 12 years with star­tups and invest­ments, a PhD from the US, and has worked on projects for the EU, OECD, UN. After 10 years of manage­ment expe­ri­ence and inno­va­tion in Telenor, focusing on glob­al­iza­tion and digi­ti­za­tion, he has become an entre­pre­neur again. Taug has also been Assoc. Professor of BI’s Insti­tute of entre­pre­neur­ship and strategy for over 10 years.
BI Norwe­gian Busi­ness School and JOIN21 have set up a program for leaders called Network Manage­ment in prac­tice, it may be a good place to start for those who want to under­stand more.

2018-11-07T16:36:50+00:00

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