Petter Haugen, Rådmann, Våler Kommune

In a connected world it is important to combine hierarchy and networks. The network analysis has given us valuable insights about who we are. Networkleadership is key to succeed with automation and innovation. It is our relations that will create the opportunities for the future.”

- Petter Haugen, Councilman, Våler Municipality

Petter Haugen, Rådmann, Våler Kommune

“In a connected world it is impor­tant to combine hier­archy and networks. The network analysis has given us valu­able insights about who we are. Networklead­er­ship is key to succeed with automa­tion and inno­va­tion. It is our rela­tions that will create the oppor­tu­ni­ties for the future”

- Petter Haugen, Coun­cilman, Våler Munic­i­pality

Digitalizing the public sector

Digitalizing the public sector

  • Less than 10% of managers have ever seen their orga­ni­za­tion as a network.
  • It is in network knowl­edge living, trust is created, and work happens.
  • The average leader discuss with approx­i­mately 1.7 people before making an impor­tant deci­sion.
Hvem digitaliserer rådmennene?

Digitalizing the public sector

  • Less than 10% of managers have ever seen their orga­ni­za­tion as a network.
  • It is in network knowl­edge living, trust is created, and work happens.
  • The average leader discuss with approx­i­mately 1.7 people before making an impor­tant deci­sion.

Do public sector management have the competence to break down the barriers and the hierarchy they themselves have built? Leaders seem to be comfortable with the hierarchy, it is predictable and easy and lead. Digitization is however something that happens further down in the organization.

Leaders in the public sector seem to be comfort­able in a hier­archy struc­ture, it is predictable and easy and command in. Under 10% of managers has seen their orga­ni­za­tion as a network, which is very basic to under­stand how the orga­ni­za­tion really works. For leaders in the public sector it is approx­i­mately 5%. The current hypoth­esis is that the managers are the best at managing infor­ma­tion to make deci­sions and give input to inno­va­tion and improve­ments. In my career working with star­tups, inter­na­tional compa­nies, govern­ment / munic­ipal orga­ni­za­tions and in my PhD, I have always been inter­ested in the rela­tion­ship between knowl­edge and value creation. A reason­able hypoth­esis is that if you rely on rele­vant infor­ma­tion and unique knowl­edge and do not share it with anyone, the value creation becomes small. The ques­tion then becomes; what happens if you system­at­i­cally start sharing your unique knowl­edge with others? In short, is about putting knowl­edge in motion.

90% of leaders do not have enough insight into how the orga­ni­za­tion actu­ally works.

What is digitalization for the public sector?

My expe­ri­ence is that what­ever the words of trans­for­ma­tion and digi­ti­za­tion really mean, it must start in the ministries and munic­i­pal­i­ties. They speak about central­iza­tion and stan­dard­iza­tion which actu­ally creates even greater hier­ar­chies and distance. They have built, and main­tained the silos and enjoy sitting on top and directing. Trans­for­ma­tion is breaking down the estab­lished, and in the ‘silos’ it’s all about working more across disci­plines. Digi­ti­za­tion is using new tech­nology to benefit the employee and the orga­ni­za­tion, and we as employees must adjust the way we work according to tech­no­log­ical devel­op­ment. It is reason­able to assume that central­ized and stan­dard­ized munic­i­pal­i­ties build a hier­ar­chi­cally struc­ture and become even slower than they are in today. Polit­ical leaders are obser­vant and apply pres­sure as Norway falls on the digi­ti­za­tion index.

The depart­ments rely on the digi­ti­za­tion and trans­for­ma­tion wave, but do not know what that means.

A digitally fit public sector

I have met many leaders in the public sector and they are strug­gling to under­stand what to do in what order. It is vital that the munic­i­pal­i­ties’ internal digital fitness1 is at a certain level before digi­tizing central services for resi­dents. I have inves­ti­gated a ‘digi­ti­za­tion index’2 in 50 randomly selected munic­i­pal­i­ties in Norway, and corre­lated it with councilmen’s digital foot­prints and there are some good results. A very few of these are good leaders, others are good because they have their own, often younger, expert who do the job for them. Initial find­ings show that there is less ‘digital fitness’ among the manage­ment team than the average digital knowl­edge in the munic­i­pality orga­ni­za­tion. Those with the best chance to succeed are munic­i­pal­i­ties with a Mayor and Coun­cilman who ‘live’ digi­tally and have a lead­er­ship team who under­stands the impor­tance of using cloud services, and social media is a natural part of their routines.

In other words, munic­i­pal­i­ties with leaders and manage­ment teams with low digital fitness have little chance of succeeding with their digi­ti­za­tion plans. I have worked with orga­ni­za­tions where I have seen that tech­nology depart­ment has taken an initia­tive to auto­mate work processes or launch collab­o­ra­tion solu­tions (Work­place by Face­book for example). There may be some good stories to tell leaders or the govern­ment offi­cials, but the orga­ni­za­tion is not neces­sarily getting smarter and faster at utilizing new tech­nology. However, a holistic approach and strong focus on helping people adopt new tech­nology will give results. There is a “tech­nology fatigue” out there, and the people fail to use what leaders and IT depart­ments come up with. With new tech­nology coming in some­thing else must go, and it is crucial to help exec­u­tives and employees utilize and exploit new tech­nology in order to create lasting impact. After visits to dozens of munic­i­pal­i­ties, I see that many munic­ipal orga­ni­za­tions simply launch cloud tech­nology such as Office 365 and hope for the best.

Too much knit and binders in Norwe­gian compa­nies! Should you succeed in automating customer service, the indi­vidual and organization’s Digital Fitness must be at a certain level, unless you will fail …

1Digital fitness is the staff and organization’s ability to work digi­tally. And it should be at a certain level before starting to digi­tize its services to customers.
2The digi­ti­za­tion index is based on the number of different tech­nolo­gies used by the munic­i­pal­i­ties in rela­tion to digi­ti­za­tion, social media and content marketing, compar­ison of social media usage, and frequency and senti­ment analysis from social media customers.

Centralization or co-creation?

Based on the automa­tion hysteria, some munic­i­pal­i­ties purchase expen­sive licenses from the private sector, then some tech­nology resource see an oppor­tu­nity in terms of a career-move and find come up with processes that are hard, and should have been shut down. I have recently had the plea­sure of working with an exciting local network where six munic­i­pal­i­ties work together to deliver services more effi­ciently. They have ambi­tions to become the most effec­tive and inno­v­a­tive. Looking at the six munic­i­pal­i­ties as a network will reveal the inter­ac­tion between them. It is then easy to uncover the most impor­tant features and where the exper­tise is. Based on insights, one can, for example, look at where the exper­tise is strongest and build a knowl­edge center that all the munic­i­pal­i­ties can use.

An example of a knowl­edge center are attor­neys now that GDPR has been imple­mented. One munic­i­pality has five good lawyers, another has one or two. These envi­ron­ments can be connected and solve prob­lems across the munic­i­pal­i­ties faster, and at a lower cost. Another example is tech­no­log­ical compe­tence. One of the munic­i­pal­i­ties in the network has some very skilled tech­nocrats who are in the process of automating a service and have invested in some expen­sive licenses. A knowl­edge center is estab­lished, and all six munic­i­pal­i­ties are involved and benefit from the shared exper­tise. Improve­ments and invest­ments are made shared. Resulting in increased produc­tivity, committed employees, and lower costs. This can be estab­lished in a few months and will most likely be more effec­tive and create better solu­tions than the munic­i­pal­i­ties that are plan­ning to merge. That will take 2–3 years, and it will take another 3 to 5 years, maybe longer, before the indus­trial approach to central­iza­tion and stan­dard­iza­tion creates produc­tivity, slightly dissat­is­fied employees, and lower costs.

nettverksledelse

Figure 1 — The talk is about connecting exper­tise, but then they need to under­stand network manage­ment.

Automating for the sake of automation

Munic­i­pal­i­ties need to get better results from our taxes, that is unde­ni­able. At the same time, it is impor­tant to say that the results also fail for the unco­or­di­nated initia­tives on coop­er­a­tion between the munic­i­pal­i­ties. Loosely collab­o­ra­tive coop­er­a­tion across munic­i­pal­i­ties often does not coin­cide with profit. There’s only a lot of discus­sions. If digi­ti­za­tion is about becoming more effi­cient through the use of new tech­nology, we see that many munic­i­pal­i­ties start automating some processes without plan­ning prop­erly. The local council rarely have an overall plan, so it falls in the hands of a few tech­nology experts at the IT depart­ment that auto­mate one process. The initia­tive is presented and the coun­cilors suddenly have some­thing to tell the politi­cians. What the tech­nol­o­gists have forgotten is to judge if the process is so old that it becomes irrel­e­vant, an inno­va­tion process at the depart­ment next door has made a new way of doing the same process, or it has been purchased a cloud-service where solving the same issue is part of the service.

Many of these initia­tives provide little to the overall usage of your taxes, but done correctly, such initia­tives can be pilot projects in a more compre­hen­sive and value-based program. In that internal program it is impor­tant to ensure involve­ment from the right people; politi­cians, munic­ipal manage­ment, HR, IT, commu­ni­ca­tion and process owners. If there’s external processes to be auto­mated for resi­dents and busi­ness, the same method applies. Both employees and resi­dents need help to use new tech­nology. We call it adop­tion. It’s orga­ni­za­tional devel­op­ment, and must be commu­ni­cated as a journey that gives results over time. Then, it is impor­tant to have a well-estab­lished program, and an effect-stair­case that visu­alize the steps needed to become an effi­cient and inno­v­a­tive munic­i­pality.

The pres­sure on digi­ti­za­tion means that many munic­i­pal­i­ties auto­mate to auto­mate.

Putting knowledge in motion

Network manage­ment is about under­standing the orga­ni­za­tion as a network, setting up an inter­dis­ci­pli­nary program owned by the munic­ipal manage­ment (HR, IT, Com), and launch rele­vant tech­nology intel­li­gently. Finding key indi­vid­uals and the right knowl­edge-brokers that can help others under­stand why this tech­nology will help them, and build an orga­ni­za­tional struc­ture that helps people utilize new tech­nology in a way that creates value for the indi­vidual and for the orga­ni­za­tion.

It is impor­tant that managers and experts work between disci­plines and in direct contact. Orga­ni­za­tions that have to go through 3 to 4 people before obtaining the right expertise/information will not last long. The assess­ment of good ideas often take too long, and stops prema­turely if it needs to be reviewed by manage­ment, before there is a chance to actu­ally test the idea. My own research shows that managers go to 1.7 people before making a deci­sion, one of them being them­selves. So after discussing what is going to be decided with them­selves for a while, managers ask 0.7 other people for input. The most fright­ening thing is that they go to someone who is close and a similar to them, so in reality they ask for a confir­ma­tion of their own deci­sion. Leaders must learn to reach broader parts of the orga­ni­za­tion, and talk to rele­vant experts to succeed in their digi­ti­za­tion plans to make better deci­sions.

Figure 2 — A manage­ment team that has worked with inter­op­er­ability services — before and after

Leaders prefer to talk to them­selves …

System thinking

System thinking is impor­tant for munic­i­pal­i­ties. System thinking is about seeing the bigger picture, or more precisely seeing the system at work. There is a lot to learn from system thinkers like Fran­cisco Varela, Humberto Matu­rana and Gregory Bateson, don’t want to read? watch: Pay it forward, Butterfly effect, or Game of Thrones. They show how the outside world is a system where things are connected, adjust one thing, and it has conse­quences else­where. In Game of Thrones, you also see that leaders with good and inter­dis­ci­pli­nary rela­tion­ships are those who survive. Today’s world is becoming more and more linked together across features, orga­ni­za­tions, and coun­tries, while the tech­nology is advancing at fast rate.

Network-manage­ment is about; Creating inter­ac­tion, linking exper­tise, making good deci­sions, managing change and diffi­culty, creating energy and inno­va­tion, and creating good rela­tion­ships with citi­zens and part­ners. It drives the collec­tive intel­li­gence which becomes increas­ingly more impor­tant for effi­ciency and value creation.

Game Of Thrones network

Figure 3 — Contrary to the depar­ture of public leaders, lead­er­ship in Game of Thrones is a posi­tion of life and death. Thyron has had rela­tion­ships across from the start, and is one of the few who have survived all the seasons …

Network manage­ment is system thinking and is about creating inter­ac­tion, linking exper­tise, making good deci­sions, managing change and diffi­culty, creating energy and inno­va­tion, and creating good rela­tion­ships with resi­dents and part­ners. It drives the collec­tive intel­li­gence that becomes even more impor­tant for effi­ciency and value creation.

Transforming the way we work

Trans­for­ma­tion is about finding new and smarter ways to work and building good networks inter­nally and exter­nally with customers and part­ners. Digi­ti­za­tion is applying new tech­nology in a way that creates value for the indi­vidual, and for the orga­ni­za­tion, and for the world.

We need to under­stand orga­ni­za­tions as networks, and be conscious of how value is created through inter­dis­ci­pli­narity. We can observe the silos and how they should be connected to create more inter­ac­tion and value, we observe who is central, who is isolated, and who connects different ecosys­tems together. With this knowl­edge we can create good solu­tions that result in committed employees, inno­va­tion and produc­tivity. For digi­ti­za­tion, network insights are used for the intel­li­gent launch of new tech­nology, and to facil­i­tate orga­ni­za­tional changes smarter. Knowl­edge is alive in networks, trust is created and it’s where work happens. It chal­lenges the leaders and the estab­lished order, because networks are often invis­ible and diffi­cult to lead.

Intelligent technology launch

Figure 4 — Networks can be used to under­stand commu­ni­ca­tion, launch new tech­nology, adjust orga­ni­za­tional design, here we observe the siloes, central indi­vid­uals, and the brokers that keep the orga­ni­za­tion together.

Network-based value creation is central to municipalities

When looking at an orga­ni­za­tion as a network, no one is the same. From a value creation perspec­tive, networks are central, and the coun­cilman who under­stands the impor­tance of networking and new tech­nology and can facil­i­tate the intro­duc­tion of new tech in a smart way. And has a unique advan­tage over those who doubt the power of networks. The Scan­di­na­vian lead­er­ship has an advan­tage given a more involving lead­er­ship style. With insights about networks, good algo­rithms, new tech­nology and good advi­sors, munic­i­pal­i­ties can get unique insights and get an advan­tage over 90% of the other munic­i­pal­i­ties in the world. With new tech­nology and good orga­ni­za­tional infra­struc­ture, Norwe­gian munic­i­pal­i­ties can adopt new tech­nology that provide resi­dents with good services that create effi­cient and inno­v­a­tive munic­i­pal­i­ties. And perhaps a network of munic­i­pal­i­ties become as impor­tant and effec­tive as central­iza­tion. If we are smart, we can retake the number one spot from Denmark.

Network Manage­ment in prac­tice

Do public sector management have the competence to break down the barriers and the hierarchy they themselves have built? Leaders seem to be comfortable with the hierarchy, it is predictable and easy and lead. Digitization is however something that happens further down in the organization.

90% of leaders do not have enough insight into how the orga­ni­za­tion actu­ally works.

Leaders in the public sector seem to be comfort­able in a hier­archy struc­ture, it is predictable and easy and command in. Under 10% of managers has seen their orga­ni­za­tion as a network, which is very basic to under­stand how the orga­ni­za­tion really works. For leaders in the public sector it is approx­i­mately 5%. The current hypoth­esis is that the managers are the best at managing infor­ma­tion to make deci­sions and give input to inno­va­tion and improve­ments. In my career working with star­tups, inter­na­tional compa­nies, govern­ment / munic­ipal orga­ni­za­tions and in my PhD, I have always been inter­ested in the rela­tion­ship between knowl­edge and value creation. A reason­able hypoth­esis is that if you rely on rele­vant infor­ma­tion and unique knowl­edge and do not share it with anyone, the value creation becomes small. The ques­tion then becomes; what happens if you system­at­i­cally start sharing your unique knowl­edge with others? In short, is about putting knowl­edge in motion.

What is digitalization for the public sector?

The depart­ments rely on the digi­ti­za­tion and trans­for­ma­tion wave, but do not know what that means.

My expe­ri­ence is that what­ever the words of trans­for­ma­tion and digi­ti­za­tion really mean, it must start in the ministries and munic­i­pal­i­ties. They speak about central­iza­tion and stan­dard­iza­tion which actu­ally creates even greater hier­ar­chies and distance. They have built, and main­tained the silos and enjoy sitting on top and directing. Trans­for­ma­tion is breaking down the estab­lished, and in the ‘silos’ it’s all about working more across disci­plines. Digi­ti­za­tion is using new tech­nology to benefit the employee and the orga­ni­za­tion, and we as employees must adjust the way we work according to tech­no­log­ical devel­op­ment. It is reason­able to assume that central­ized and stan­dard­ized munic­i­pal­i­ties build a hier­ar­chi­cally struc­ture and become even slower than they are in today. Polit­ical leaders are obser­vant and apply pres­sure as Norway falls on the digi­ti­za­tion index.

A digitally fit public sector

Too much knit and binders in Norwe­gian compa­nies! Should you succeed in automating customer service, the indi­vidual and organization’s Digital Fitness must be at a certain level, unless you will fail …

I have met many leaders in the public sector and they are strug­gling to under­stand what to do in what order. It is vital that the munic­i­pal­i­ties’ internal digital fitness1 is at a certain level before digi­tizing central services for resi­dents. I have inves­ti­gated a ‘digi­ti­za­tion index’2 in 50 randomly selected munic­i­pal­i­ties in Norway, and corre­lated it with councilmen’s digital foot­prints and there are some good results. A very few of these are good leaders, others are good because they have their own, often younger, expert who do the job for them. Initial find­ings show that there is less ‘digital fitness’ among the manage­ment team than the average digital knowl­edge in the munic­i­pality orga­ni­za­tion. Those with the best chance to succeed are munic­i­pal­i­ties with a Mayor and Coun­cilman who ‘live’ digi­tally and have a lead­er­ship team who under­stands the impor­tance of using cloud services, and social media is a natural part of their routines.

In other words, munic­i­pal­i­ties with leaders and manage­ment teams with low digital fitness have little chance of succeeding with their digi­ti­za­tion plans. I have worked with orga­ni­za­tions where I have seen that tech­nology depart­ment has taken an initia­tive to auto­mate work processes or launch collab­o­ra­tion solu­tions (Work­place by Face­book for example). There may be some good stories to tell leaders or the govern­ment offi­cials, but the orga­ni­za­tion is not neces­sarily getting smarter and faster at utilizing new tech­nology. However, a holistic approach and strong focus on helping people adopt new tech­nology will give results. There is a “tech­nology fatigue” out there, and the people fail to use what leaders and IT depart­ments come up with. With new tech­nology coming in some­thing else must go, and it is crucial to help exec­u­tives and employees utilize and exploit new tech­nology in order to create lasting impact. After visits to dozens of munic­i­pal­i­ties, I see that many munic­ipal orga­ni­za­tions simply launch cloud tech­nology such as Office 365 and hope for the best.

1Digital fitness is the staff and organization’s ability to work digi­tally. And it should be at a certain level before starting to digi­tize its services to customers.
2The digi­ti­za­tion index is based on the number of different tech­nolo­gies used by the munic­i­pal­i­ties in rela­tion to digi­ti­za­tion, social media and content marketing, compar­ison of social media usage, and frequency and senti­ment analysis from social media customers.

Centralization or co-creation?

nettverksledelse

Figure 1 — The talk is about connecting exper­tise, but then they need to under­stand network manage­ment.

Based on the automa­tion hysteria, some munic­i­pal­i­ties purchase expen­sive licenses from the private sector, then some tech­nology resource see an oppor­tu­nity in terms of a career-move and find come up with processes that are hard, and should have been shut down. I have recently had the plea­sure of working with an exciting local network where six munic­i­pal­i­ties work together to deliver services more effi­ciently. They have ambi­tions to become the most effec­tive and inno­v­a­tive. Looking at the six munic­i­pal­i­ties as a network will reveal the inter­ac­tion between them. It is then easy to uncover the most impor­tant features and where the exper­tise is. Based on insights, one can, for example, look at where the exper­tise is strongest and build a knowl­edge center that all the munic­i­pal­i­ties can use.

An example of a knowl­edge center are attor­neys now that GDPR has been imple­mented. One munic­i­pality has five good lawyers, another has one or two. These envi­ron­ments can be connected and solve prob­lems across the munic­i­pal­i­ties faster, and at a lower cost. Another example is tech­no­log­ical compe­tence. One of the munic­i­pal­i­ties in the network has some very skilled tech­nocrats who are in the process of automating a service and have invested in some expen­sive licenses. A knowl­edge center is estab­lished, and all six munic­i­pal­i­ties are involved and benefit from the shared exper­tise. Improve­ments and invest­ments are made shared. Resulting in increased produc­tivity, committed employees, and lower costs. This can be estab­lished in a few months and will most likely be more effec­tive and create better solu­tions than the munic­i­pal­i­ties that are plan­ning to merge. That will take 2–3 years, and it will take another 3 to 5 years, maybe longer, before the indus­trial approach to central­iza­tion and stan­dard­iza­tion creates produc­tivity, slightly dissat­is­fied employees, and lower costs.

Automating for the sake of automation

The pres­sure on digi­ti­za­tion means that many munic­i­pal­i­ties auto­mate to auto­mate.

Munic­i­pal­i­ties need to get better results from our taxes, that is unde­ni­able. At the same time, it is impor­tant to say that the results also fail for the unco­or­di­nated initia­tives on coop­er­a­tion between the munic­i­pal­i­ties. Loosely collab­o­ra­tive coop­er­a­tion across munic­i­pal­i­ties often does not coin­cide with profit. There’s only a lot of discus­sions. If digi­ti­za­tion is about becoming more effi­cient through the use of new tech­nology, we see that many munic­i­pal­i­ties start automating some processes without plan­ning prop­erly. The local council rarely have an overall plan, so it falls in the hands of a few tech­nology experts at the IT depart­ment that auto­mate one process. The initia­tive is presented and the coun­cilors suddenly have some­thing to tell the politi­cians. What the tech­nol­o­gists have forgotten is to judge if the process is so old that it becomes irrel­e­vant, an inno­va­tion process at the depart­ment next door has made a new way of doing the same process, or it has been purchased a cloud-service where solving the same issue is part of the service.

Many of these initia­tives provide little to the overall usage of your taxes, but done correctly, such initia­tives can be pilot projects in a more compre­hen­sive and value-based program. In that internal program it is impor­tant to ensure involve­ment from the right people; politi­cians, munic­ipal manage­ment, HR, IT, commu­ni­ca­tion and process owners. If there’s external processes to be auto­mated for resi­dents and busi­ness, the same method applies. Both employees and resi­dents need help to use new tech­nology. We call it adop­tion. It’s orga­ni­za­tional devel­op­ment, and must be commu­ni­cated as a journey that gives results over time. Then, it is impor­tant to have a well-estab­lished program, and an effect-stair­case that visu­alize the steps needed to become an effi­cient and inno­v­a­tive munic­i­pality.

Putting knowledge in motion

Figure 2 — A manage­ment team that has worked with inter­op­er­ability services — before and after

Leaders prefer to talk to them­selves …

Network manage­ment is about under­standing the orga­ni­za­tion as a network, setting up an inter­dis­ci­pli­nary program owned by the munic­ipal manage­ment (HR, IT, Com), and launch rele­vant tech­nology intel­li­gently. Finding key indi­vid­uals and the right knowl­edge-brokers that can help others under­stand why this tech­nology will help them, and build an orga­ni­za­tional struc­ture that helps people utilize new tech­nology in a way that creates value for the indi­vidual and for the orga­ni­za­tion.

It is impor­tant that managers and experts work between disci­plines and in direct contact. Orga­ni­za­tions that have to go through 3 to 4 people before obtaining the right expertise/information will not last long. The assess­ment of good ideas often take too long, and stops prema­turely if it needs to be reviewed by manage­ment, before there is a chance to actu­ally test the idea. My own research shows that managers go to 1.7 people before making a deci­sion, one of them being them­selves. So after discussing what is going to be decided with them­selves for a while, managers ask 0.7 other people for input. The most fright­ening thing is that they go to someone who is close and a similar to them, so in reality they ask for a confir­ma­tion of their own deci­sion. Leaders must learn to reach broader parts of the orga­ni­za­tion, and talk to rele­vant experts to succeed in their digi­ti­za­tion plans to make better deci­sions.

System thinking

System thinking is impor­tant for munic­i­pal­i­ties. System thinking is about seeing the bigger picture, or more precisely seeing the system at work. There is a lot to learn from system thinkers like Fran­cisco Varela, Humberto Matu­rana and Gregory Bateson, don’t want to read? watch: Pay it forward, Butterfly effect, or Game of Thrones. They show how the outside world is a system where things are connected, adjust one thing, and it has conse­quences else­where. In Game of Thrones, you also see that leaders with good and inter­dis­ci­pli­nary rela­tion­ships are those who survive. Today’s world is becoming more and more linked together across features, orga­ni­za­tions, and coun­tries, while the tech­nology is advancing at fast rate.

Network-manage­ment is about; Creating inter­ac­tion, linking exper­tise, making good deci­sions, managing change and diffi­culty, creating energy and inno­va­tion, and creating good rela­tion­ships with citi­zens and part­ners. It drives the collec­tive intel­li­gence which becomes increas­ingly more impor­tant for effi­ciency and value creation.

Game Of Thrones network

Figure 3 — Contrary to the depar­ture of public leaders, lead­er­ship in Game of Thrones is a posi­tion of life and death. Thyron has had rela­tion­ships across from the start, and is one of the few who have survived all the seasons …

Network manage­ment is system thinking and is about creating inter­ac­tion, linking exper­tise, making good deci­sions, managing change and diffi­culty, creating energy and inno­va­tion, and creating good rela­tion­ships with resi­dents and part­ners. It drives the collec­tive intel­li­gence that becomes even more impor­tant for effi­ciency and value creation.

Transforming the way we work

Trans­for­ma­tion is about finding new and smarter ways to work and building good networks inter­nally and exter­nally with customers and part­ners. Digi­ti­za­tion is applying new tech­nology in a way that creates value for the indi­vidual, and for the orga­ni­za­tion, and for the world.

We need to under­stand orga­ni­za­tions as networks, and be conscious of how value is created through inter­dis­ci­pli­narity. We can observe the silos and how they should be connected to create more inter­ac­tion and value, we observe who is central, who is isolated, and who connects different ecosys­tems together. With this knowl­edge we can create good solu­tions that result in committed employees, inno­va­tion and produc­tivity. For digi­ti­za­tion, network insights are used for the intel­li­gent launch of new tech­nology, and to facil­i­tate orga­ni­za­tional changes smarter. Knowl­edge is alive in networks, trust is created and it’s where work happens. It chal­lenges the leaders and the estab­lished order, because networks are often invis­ible and diffi­cult to lead.

Intelligent technology launch

Figure 4 — Networks can be used to under­stand commu­ni­ca­tion, launch new tech­nology, adjust orga­ni­za­tional design, here we observe the siloes, central indi­vid­uals, and the brokers that keep the orga­ni­za­tion together.

Network-based value creation is central to municipalities

When looking at an orga­ni­za­tion as a network, no one is the same. From a value creation perspec­tive, networks are central, and the coun­cilman who under­stands the impor­tance of networking and new tech­nology and can facil­i­tate the intro­duc­tion of new tech in a smart way. And has a unique advan­tage over those who doubt the power of networks. The Scan­di­na­vian lead­er­ship has an advan­tage given a more involving lead­er­ship style. With insights about networks, good algo­rithms, new tech­nology and good advi­sors, munic­i­pal­i­ties can get unique insights and get an advan­tage over 90% of the other munic­i­pal­i­ties in the world. With new tech­nology and good orga­ni­za­tional infra­struc­ture, Norwe­gian munic­i­pal­i­ties can adopt new tech­nology that provide resi­dents with good services that create effi­cient and inno­v­a­tive munic­i­pal­i­ties. And perhaps a network of munic­i­pal­i­ties become as impor­tant and effec­tive as central­iza­tion. If we are smart, we can retake the number one spot from Denmark.

Network Manage­ment in prac­tice
Jan Taug, founder and CEO

JAN TAUG

Jan Taug has worked over 12 years with star­tups and invest­ments, a PhD from the US, and has worked on projects for the EU, OECD, UN. After 10 years of manage­ment expe­ri­ence and inno­va­tion in Telenor, focusing on glob­al­iza­tion and digi­ti­za­tion, he has become an entre­pre­neur again. Taug has also been Assoc. Professor of BI’s Insti­tute of entre­pre­neur­ship and strategy for over 10 years.
BI Norwe­gian Busi­ness School and JOIN21 have set up a program for leaders called Network Manage­ment in prac­tice, it may be a good place to start for those who want to under­stand more.

Jan Taug, founder and CEO

JAN TAUG

Jan Taug has worked over 12 years with star­tups and invest­ments, a PhD from the US, and has worked on projects for the EU, OECD, UN. After 10 years of manage­ment expe­ri­ence and inno­va­tion in Telenor, focusing on glob­al­iza­tion and digi­ti­za­tion, he has become an entre­pre­neur again. Taug has also been Assoc. Professor of BI’s Insti­tute of entre­pre­neur­ship and strategy for over 10 years.
BI Norwe­gian Busi­ness School and JOIN21 have set up a program for leaders called Network Manage­ment in prac­tice, it may be a good place to start for those who want to under­stand more.

2018-11-07T16:49:33+00:00

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